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The protected areas of Yorkshire

The county of Yorkshire possesses some of the most beautiful countryside in the United Kingdom. Sometimes the beauty of the county is hidden by the wet and wild climate which at times makes being outside in the countryside not a very pleasant experience. The county is home to a number of National Parks, different AONB, and a variety of Sites of Scientific Interest. This means that the land is now conserved and protected, and is also managed in a manner that makes it more accessible than it ever has been before. The industrial revolution made the county economically rich but...

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Medieval Yorkshire (Part 2)

We last left our epic saga of Yorkshire’s history in 954 AD, when King Eric of Norway was slain by King Edred of England at the battle of Stainmore – thus marking the end of Viking rule in the Yorkshire area. However, the Scandinavians were to return for one last at crack at a British invasion, in the famous events leading up to the Norman Invasion of 1066. Eleventh century The English King Edward the Confessor died at the beginning of this year, sparking a contested succession which would lead to war. Norwegian Harold Hardrada, Anglo Saxon Harold Godwinson and...

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Medieval Yorkshire (Part 1)

We last left off our tale of Yorkshire’s history, in 402 AD when the last Roman garrison in the county left the city of York. This marks the beginning of the early Medieval chapter in the county’s history. The Medieval period of European history is somewhat of a fascination for people across the globe with its tales of crusades, galivanting knights, warring houses and tyrannical kings. But what did this bloody era of history bring to the beautiful dales and craggy moors of the county of Yorkshire? 600 AD and further years Around this time a king by the name...

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Romans and Yorkshire

Our last article on the history of Yorkshire ended with the arrival of the Romans in Yorkshire around 60 AD. This period marked the beginning of documenting records of Britain, so much of what you read here will come from written Roman sources. Many significant events occurred in the 329 years the Yorkshire area was controlled by the Roman Empire – just a few of which are chronicled below. 71 AD The first real evidence of Roman consolidation of military victories into actual conquered territories occurred in Doncaster, South Yorkshire. Here they built a fort on the banks of the...

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A brief history of Early Yorkshire

The area of Yorkshire in Northern England has been home to humans since 8000BC, since the Ice Age glaciers retreated North and left the land habitable. The origins of modern Yorkshire begin in 1055, when the name was first written down in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle. Let us chronicle just some of the key places and events of the ancient Yorkshire area. 10,000 BC [caption id="attachment_148" align="alignright" width="300"] Plate V from the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Vol I.[/caption] At this time, a possible bridge of ice still linked the area and mainland Europe. The first evidence of human activity in the Yorkshire area...

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Moors & Market Towns: The Physical and Human Geography of Yorkshire

Yorkshire is the biggest county in the UK. Stretching nearly 12,000 square kilometres it has various microclimates, geological topographies and natural features. From wild and uncultivated moors, to its rolling hills or rugged coastline – Yorkshire has some of the most spectacular unspoilt countryside in the whole of the UK. Small wonder many locals and visitors alike have called it ‘God’s Own County’ for hundreds of years. Physical Historically, Yorkshire’s natural borders have been and remain the River Tees to the North, the Humber Estuary to the South, the Pennine Hills to the West and the craggy North Sea coast...

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The Best Universities in Yorkshire

The UK is well known and respected around the world for its old and prestigious Universities. So, it’s no wonder that Yorkshire too has some top class educational institutions. From the perennial student party towns of Leeds and Sheffield to the historical calm of York, down your drinks and let’s count the down the top four Universities in the great county. Leeds Founded in 1831, Leeds University has 33,000 students each year - making it the 5th biggest Uni by student size in the UK. It’s also in the prestigious Russel Group, along with Sheffield and York who also made...

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Sport in Yorkshire – Part 2

Yorkshire is the home to many of the top sides that play in Super League’s Rugby League competition. One of the competitions most successful sides are the Leeds Rhinos who play their games at Headingly. They play of the pitch alongside the cricket stadium, so do not share the same grass, and over recent decades no club side in the country has had the same success as the Rhinos. Since the Super League first started in 1996, Leeds have won the competition eight times, setting a record. Previous to that, they competed in the Rugby Football League since its inception...

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Sport in Yorkshire – Part 1

Sport in Yorkshire is taken very seriously and the county prides itself on having some of the strongest sides in the country. This is especially true of the sports that field representative sides from the county and every Yorkshire side that steps on to the field, or the court, on the track, or even in the pool, will truly believe that they are representing the strongest county in the country. The emblem worn on every Yorkshire representative shirt, or vest, is the white rose. The flower represents the House of York which the county sided with during the English Civil...

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Oldest Buildings in Yorkshire

Yorkshire is a county rich in history – from mysterious standing stones, to ancient churches and monumental cave systems. Even the landscape feels and looks ancient in places, with rock formations dating back millions of years. Read on for the surprising, and sometimes morbid, history of some the county’s most aged buildings. Ripon Cathedral First established in 672, this fantastic stone cathedral has been destroyed and rebuilt four times over the 1350 years it has been used as a place of worship. The original crypt still stands to this day and is open to visitors at various times throughout the...

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